Varför krigar Ryssland i Georgien – egentligen?

1) Ryssland vill tämja små kaxiga grannländer som låter sig influeras av väst. Ett NATO-medlemskap är inte att tänka på. Sticker ni upp får ni spö, är budskapet. Detta verkar vara en vanlig förklaring i media.

2) Ryssland vill visa musklerna gentemot USA, EU m.fl. Med oljepengarna har de återigen blivit en stormakt att räkna med. Också en vanlig förklaring.

3) Allt handlar om oljan. Som vanligt. Detta poängteras framförallt av vänsteranhängare. Som vanligt.

4) Georgien vill inte ge Sydossetien självständighet. Och Ryssland hjälper de frihetstörstande Sydossetierna mot Georgierna. En lite mer nyanserad bild som sprids lite varstans.

5) Ryssland hjälper Sydossetierna – och det med rätta – men Ryssland har själviska motiv. Vg gå till nr 1, nr 2 eller nr 3. Denna variant har jag inte stött på någonstans.

Intressant? Läs även andra bloggares åsikter om , , , , , . Läs mer i SvD, DN, AB, Exp.

Intressant? Dela artikeln!

Gillar du Avancemang så kanske du gillar den här boken?

För dig som uppskattar science fiction, rymdopera och en och annan filosofisk fundering.

79 kr för e-boken. Mer info, eller köp, klicka här.

Lämna ett svar

Denna webbplats använder Akismet för att minska skräppost. Lär dig hur din kommentardata bearbetas.

  1. Nyanserad och nyanserad… Konflikten är gammal, och kriget går tillbaka till början av 90-talet när varken Georgien eller utbrytarstaten var demokratisk. Alltså är det svårt att påstå att kraven på självständighet har demokratisk grund.

    Så visst gör Georgien fel när man inte genomför demokratiska omröstningar om frågan, för att kolla om staten verkligen VILL vara självständig eller inte. Men Ryssland gör fullständigt tvärfel när dom invaderar Georgien. Att Ryssland skulle ”hjälpa dom frihetstörstande ossetierna” är fullständigt absurt. Rysslands ledning är helt ointresserat av någon folkgrupps frihet. Hade dom varit det hade dom satt pressen bakom folkomröstning, inte invaderat.

  2. The Russo-Georgian War and the Balance of Power
    August 12, 2008

    By George Friedman

    Related Special Topic Pages
    Crisis in South Ossetia
    U.S. Weakness and Russia’s Window of Opportunity
    The Russian Resurgence
    Kosovo, Russia and the West

    The Russian invasion of Georgia has not changed the balance of power in Eurasia. It simply announced that the balance of power had already shifted. The United States has been absorbed in its wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as potential conflict with Iran and a destabilizing situation in Pakistan. It has no strategic ground forces in reserve and is in no position to intervene on the Russian periphery. This, as we have argued, has opened a window of opportunity for the Russians to reassert their influence in the former Soviet sphere. Moscow did not have to concern itself with the potential response of the United States or Europe; hence, the invasion did not shift the balance of power. The balance of power had already shifted, and it was up to the Russians when to make this public. They did that Aug. 8.

    Let’s begin simply by reviewing the last few days.

    On the night of Thursday, Aug. 7, forces of the Republic of Georgia drove across the border of South Ossetia, a secessionist region of Georgia that has functioned as an independent entity since the fall of the Soviet Union. The forces drove on to the capital, Tskhinvali, which is close to the border. Georgian forces got bogged down while trying to take the city. In spite of heavy fighting, they never fully secured the city, nor the rest of South Ossetia.

    On the morning of Aug. 8, Russian forces entered South Ossetia, using armored and motorized infantry forces along with air power. South Ossetia was informally aligned with Russia, and Russia acted to prevent the region’s absorption by Georgia. Given the speed with which the Russians responded — within hours of the Georgian attack — the Russians were expecting the Georgian attack and were themselves at their jumping-off points. The counterattack was carefully planned and competently executed, and over the next 48 hours, the Russians succeeded in defeating the main Georgian force and forcing a retreat. By Sunday, Aug. 10, the Russians had consolidated their position in South Ossetia.

    On Monday, the Russians extended their offensive into Georgia proper, attacking on two axes. One was south from South Ossetia to the Georgian city of Gori. The other drive was from Abkhazia, another secessionist region of Georgia aligned with the Russians. This drive was designed to cut the road between the Georgian capital of Tbilisi and its ports. By this point, the Russians had bombed the military airfields at Marneuli and Vaziani and appeared to have disabled radars at the international airport in Tbilisi. These moves brought Russian forces to within 40 miles of the Georgian capital, while making outside reinforcement and resupply of Georgian forces extremely difficult should anyone wish to undertake it.

    The Mystery Behind the Georgian Invasion

    In this simple chronicle, there is something quite mysterious: Why did the Georgians choose to invade South Ossetia on Thursday night? There had been a great deal of shelling by the South Ossetians of Georgian villages for the previous three nights, but while possibly more intense than usual, artillery exchanges were routine. The Georgians might not have fought well, but they committed fairly substantial forces that must have taken at the very least several days to deploy and supply. Georgia’s move was deliberate.

    The United States is Georgia’s closest ally. It maintained about 130 military advisers in Georgia, along with civilian advisers, contractors involved in all aspects of the Georgian government and people doing business in Georgia. It is inconceivable that the Americans were unaware of Georgia’s mobilization and intentions. It is also inconceivable that the Americans were unaware that the Russians had deployed substantial forces on the South Ossetian frontier. U.S. technical intelligence, from satellite imagery and signals intelligence to unmanned aerial vehicles, could not miss the fact that thousands of Russian troops were moving to forward positions. The Russians clearly knew the Georgians were ready to move. How could the United States not be aware of the Russians? Indeed, given the posture of Russian troops, how could intelligence analysts have missed the possibility that t he Russians had laid a trap, hoping for a Georgian invasion to justify its own counterattack?

    It is very difficult to imagine that the Georgians launched their attack against U.S. wishes. The Georgians rely on the United States, and they were in no position to defy it. This leaves two possibilities. The first is a massive breakdown in intelligence, in which the United States either was unaware of the existence of Russian forces, or knew of the Russian forces but — along with the Georgians — miscalculated Russia’s intentions. The United States, along with other countries, has viewed Russia through the prism of the 1990s, when the Russian military was in shambles and the Russian government was paralyzed. The United States has not seen Russia make a decisive military move beyond its borders since the Afghan war of the 1970s-1980s. The Russians had systematically avoided such moves for years. The United States had assumed that the Russians would not risk the consequences of an invasion.

    If this was the case, then it points to the central reality of this situation: The Russians had changed dramatically, along with the balance of power in the region. They welcomed the opportunity to drive home the new reality, which was that they could invade Georgia and the United States and Europe could not respond. As for risk, they did not view the invasion as risky. Militarily, there was no counter. Economically, Russia is an energy exporter doing quite well — indeed, the Europeans need Russian energy even more than the Russians need to sell it to them. Politically, as we shall see, the Americans needed the Russians more than the Russians needed the Americans. Moscow’s calculus was that this was the moment to strike. The Russians had been building up to it for months, as we have discussed, and they struck.

    The Western Encirclement of Russia

    To understand Russian thinking, we need to look at two events. The first is the Orange Revolution in Ukraine. From the U.S. and European point of view, the Orange Revolution represented a triumph of democracy and Western influence. From the Russian point of view, as Moscow made clear, the Orange Revolution was a CIA-funded intrusion into the internal affairs of Ukraine, designed to draw Ukraine into NATO and add to the encirclement of Russia. U.S. Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton had promised the Russians that NATO would not expand into the former Soviet Union empire.

    That promise had already been broken in 1998 by NATO’s expansion to Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic — and again in the 2004 expansion, which absorbed not only the rest of the former Soviet satellites in what is now Central Europe, but also the three Baltic states, which had been components of the Soviet Union.

    The Russians had tolerated all that, but the discussion of including Ukraine in NATO represented a fundamental threat to Russia’s national security. It would have rendered Russia indefensible and threatened to destabilize the Russian Federation itself. When the United States went so far as to suggest that Georgia be included as well, bringing NATO deeper into the Caucasus, the Russian conclusion — publicly stated — was that the United States in particular intended to encircle and break Russia.

    The second and lesser event was the decision by Europe and the United States to back Kosovo’s separation from Serbia. The Russians were friendly with Serbia, but the deeper issue for Russia was this: The principle of Europe since World War II was that, to prevent conflict, national borders would not be changed. If that principle were violated in Kosovo, other border shifts — including demands by various regions for independence from Russia — might follow. The Russians publicly and privately asked that Kosovo not be given formal independence, but instead continue its informal autonomy, which was the same thing in practical terms. Russia’s requests were ignored.

    From the Ukrainian experience, the Russians became convinced that the United States was engaged in a plan of strategic encirclement and strangulation of Russia. From the Kosovo experience, they concluded that the United States and Europe were not prepared to consider Russian wishes even in fairly minor affairs. That was the breaking point. If Russian desires could not be accommodated even in a minor matter like this, then clearly Russia and the West were in conflict. For the Russians, as we said, the question was how to respond. Having declined to respond in Kosovo, the Russians decided to respond where they had all the cards: in South Ossetia.

    Moscow had two motives, the lesser of which was as a tit-for-tat over Kosovo. If Kosovo could be declared independent under Western sponsorship, then South Ossetia and Abkhazia, the two breakaway regions of Georgia, could be declared independent under Russian sponsorship. Any objections from the United States and Europe would simply confirm their hypocrisy. This was important for internal Russian political reasons, but the second motive was far more important.

    Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin once said that the fall of the Soviet Union was a geopolitical disaster. This didn’t mean that he wanted to retain the Soviet state; rather, it meant that the disintegration of the Soviet Union had created a situation in which Russian national security was threatened by Western interests. As an example, consider that during the Cold War, St. Petersburg was about 1,200 miles away from a NATO country. Today it is about 60 miles away from Estonia, a NATO member. The disintegration of the Soviet Union had left Russia surrounded by a group of countries hostile to Russian interests in various degrees and heavily influenced by the United States, Europe and, in some cases, China.

    Resurrecting the Russian Sphere

    Putin did not want to re-establish the Soviet Union, but he did want to re-establish the Russian sphere of influence in the former Soviet Union region. To accomplish that, he had to do two things. First, he had to re-establish the credibility of the Russian army as a fighting force, at least in the context of its region. Second, he had to establish that Western guarantees, including NATO membership, meant nothing in the face of Russian power. He did not want to confront NATO directly, but he did want to confront and defeat a power that was closely aligned with the United States, had U.S. support, aid and advisers and was widely seen as being under American protection. Georgia was the perfect choice.

    By invading Georgia as Russia did (competently if not brilliantly), Putin re-established the credibility of the Russian army. But far more importantly, by doing this Putin revealed an open secret: While the United States is tied down in the Middle East, American guarantees have no value. This lesson is not for American consumption. It is something that, from the Russian point of view, the Ukrainians, the Balts and the Central Asians need to digest. Indeed, it is a lesson Putin wants to transmit to Poland and the Czech Republic as well. The United States wants to place ballistic missile defense installations in those countries, and the Russians want them to understand that allowing this to happen increases their risk, not their security.

    The Russians knew the United States would denounce their attack. This actually plays into Russian hands. The more vocal senior leaders are, the greater the contrast with their inaction, and the Russians wanted to drive home the idea that American guarantees are empty talk.

    The Russians also know something else that is of vital importance: For the United States, the Middle East is far more important than the Caucasus, and Iran is particularly important. The United States wants the Russians to participate in sanctions against Iran. Even more importantly, they do not want the Russians to sell weapons to Iran, particularly the highly effective S-300 air defense system. Georgia is a marginal issue to the United States; Iran is a central issue. The Russians are in a position to pose serious problems for the United States not only in Iran, but also with weapons sales to other countries, like Syria.

    Therefore, the United States has a problem — it either must reorient its strategy away from the Middle East and toward the Caucasus, or it has to seriously limit its response to Georgia to avoid a Russian counter in Iran. Even if the United States had an appetite for another war in Georgia at this time, it would have to calculate the Russian response in Iran — and possibly in Afghanistan (even though Moscow’s interests there are currently aligned with those of Washington).

    In other words, the Russians have backed the Americans into a corner. The Europeans, who for the most part lack expeditionary militaries and are dependent upon Russian energy exports, have even fewer options. If nothing else happens, the Russians will have demonstrated that they have resumed their role as a regional power. Russia is not a global power by any means, but a significant regional power with lots of nuclear weapons and an economy that isn’t all too shabby at the moment. It has also compelled every state on the Russian periphery to re-evaluate its position relative to Moscow. As for Georgia, the Russians appear ready to demand the resignation of President Mikhail Saakashvili. Militarily, that is their option. That is all they wanted to demonstrate, and they have demonstrated it.

    The war in Georgia, therefore, is Russia’s public return to great power status. This is not something that just happened — it has been unfolding ever since Putin took power, and with growing intensity in the past five years. Part of it has to do with the increase of Russian power, but a great deal of it has to do with the fact that the Middle Eastern wars have left the United States off-balance and short on resources. As we have written, this conflict created a window of opportunity. The Russian goal is to use that window to assert a new reality throughout the region while the Americans are tied down elsewhere and dependent on the Russians. The war was far from a surprise; it has been building for months. But the geopolitical foundations of the war have been building since 1992. Russia has been an empire for centuries. The last 15 years or so were not the new reality, but simply an aberration that would be rectified. And now it is being rectified.

    Snott direkt från facebook. Intressant läsning

  3. ”Rysslands ledning är helt ointresserat av någon folkgrupps frihet. Hade dom varit det hade dom satt pressen bakom folkomröstning, inte invaderat.”

    Eller gett Tjetjenien frihet. Ryssland lämnar mycket att önska.

  4. Jag tror Ryssland vill ha det så här:

    ”Hej, vi tänkte att ni där skulle kunna styra det här landet. Ni skulle aldrig klara er i fria val, så vi tänkte ge er militärt stöd så att ni kan ha makten. Ni bör dock komma ihåg att vi kunde valt vilka klantar som helst till det jobbet. Ni kan se det lite grann som om ni vunnit på lotteri. För att just ni ska vara de som får chansen, så tänkte vi ta en liten avgift, på säg 80% av era nationella inkomster. Kom ihåg, det blir mycket över till er och era familjer i alla fall.

    Vi kommer att börja med att destabilisera landet genom at beväpna diverse frikårer som kan köra lite etnisk rensing och sånt, och sedan så ska vi nog hitta en situation där diktatur är enda utvägen. Sitt bara vid telefonen så ringer vi när det är klart. Möjligtvis blir det bara kaos av det hela, men då har vi en liten plan för det också: Vi vill då att ert land ska förstå hur vi känner. Vi känner att vi skulle vilja ha lite vänlighet från er, lite oljekoncessioner och annat. Vi kommer inte att vara så specifika på den punkten utan se vad ni kan göra så berättar vi när det känns bra igen för oss. När det känns bar för oss så blir det mindre kaos i ert land. Harmoni är viktigt.”

  5. ”Jag tror Ryssland vill ha det så här:

    “Hej, vi tänkte att ni där skulle kunna styra det här landet. Ni skulle aldrig klara er i fria val, så vi tänkte ge er militärt stöd så att ni kan ha makten. Ni bör dock komma ihåg att vi kunde valt vilka klantar som helst till det jobbet. Ni kan se det lite grann som om ni vunnit på lotteri. För att just ni ska vara de som får chansen, så tänkte vi ta en liten avgift, på säg 80% av era nationella inkomster. Kom ihåg, det blir mycket över till er och era familjer i alla fall.

    Vi kommer att börja med att destabilisera landet genom at beväpna diverse frikårer som kan köra lite etnisk rensing och sånt, och sedan så ska vi nog hitta en situation där diktatur är enda utvägen. Sitt bara vid telefonen så ringer vi när det är klart. Möjligtvis blir det bara kaos av det hela, men då har vi en liten plan för det också: Vi vill då att ert land ska förstå hur vi känner. Vi känner att vi skulle vilja ha lite vänlighet från er, lite oljekoncessioner och annat. Vi kommer inte att vara så specifika på den punkten utan se vad ni kan göra så berättar vi när det känns bra igen för oss. När det känns bar för oss så blir det mindre kaos i ert land. Harmoni är viktigt.””

    Jag tror att Ryssland inte ser det som sin första prioritet. Rysslands agerande i Kaukasus är helt klart ett svar på den pågående ”inringningen” utav Ryssland.

  6. Inringning är det ju bara om man inte tror på det öppna samhället. Det är ju en ingen sammansvärjning mot Ryssland, utan länder som blir mer öppna och demokratiska.

    Och Ryssland vill inte vara ”inringat” av sådana länder. Utan av andra statsskick.

  7. Att USA vill ha med vartenda före detta sovjet land i Nato är väl en fråga om inringning? Polen, Tjeckien, Litauen, Estland, Lettland, Finland och nu senast, Georgien som ansöker om Nato medlemskap. Spridande utav demokrati och välstånd är en sak, men Nato är en försvars allians, ledd av USA. Klart som fan att ryssarna inte vill ha en hög med nato länder på tröskeln. Därför är Rysslands agerande helt logiskt.

  8. Om Ryssland hade varit fritt och demokratiskt hade Nato inte behövt finnas, och om det hade behövts, så hade Ryssland varit med i Nato!

    Du skriver att Rysslands agerande är helt logiskt. Javisst är det det utifrån deras subjektiva psykologiska föreställningsvärld. Men i väst tror vi ju mer på objektiva värden. Ett öppet samhälle vid Rysslands gräns upplevs som ett hot av Ryssland, och skulle vi inrätta oss efter den ryska regimens föreställningsvärld skulle vi låta Ryssland styra hela Europa och sedan världen, så att de kan känna sig säkra och okränkta. Det finns liksom ingen naturlig gräns, annan än den där vi säger stopp och håller emot.

  9. ”Om Ryssland hade varit fritt och demokratiskt hade Nato inte behövt finnas, och om det hade behövts, så hade Ryssland varit med i Nato!”

    Sverige är väl ändå fritt och demokratiskt (nåja), men vi är inte med i nato!?! Du blandar ihop begreppen.

    ”Ett öppet samhälle vid Rysslands gräns upplevs som ett hot av Ryssland”

    En USA ledd försvarsallians, som skapades under kalla kriget MOT dåvarande sovjetunionen, vid rysslands gräns, är självklart något som Ryssarna borde oroa sig för. Att inte göra det vore synnerligen naivt.

    Och sedan så är Rysslands agerande, rent militäriskt, logiskt. Det visar att Ryssland åter är en makt att räkna med, om inte en stormakt, och det skickar en signal till andra grannar som är pigga på nato. För övrigt dödades cirka 10 ryska fredsoldater under Georgiens bombardemang utav Sydossetiens huvudstad. Jag tror knappast att George Bush skulle ha suttit med armarna i kors.

    ”…och skulle vi inrätta oss efter den ryska regimens föreställningsvärld skulle vi låta Ryssland styra hela Europa och sedan världen, så att de kan känna sig säkra och okränkta.”

    Ryssland är faktiskt precis det land man skulle kunna tänka sig ta över världen, men det är ingenting aktuellt just nu. Får vi hoppas.

  10. >Ryssland är faktiskt precis det land man skulle kunna tänka sig ta
    > över världen, men det är ingenting aktuellt just nu. Får vi hoppas.

    På förekommen anledning, hur mycket tycker du är ”lagom”. Uppenbarligen ingår Georgien i det du kan tänka dig ge bort??

  11. Om du på allvar tror att Ryssland kommer att annektera hela Georgien, så lever du kvar i den tid då sovjet gick in i Tjeckien. Jag är faktiskt beredd att sätta pengar på att Georgien kommer att förbli självständigt efter den här konflikten.

    Samtidigt måste jag fråga, har inte Osseterna och Abchazerna rätt till självständighet. Det verkar vara någonting du ger blanka fan i.

  12. ”Du skriver att Rysslands agerande är helt logiskt.”

    Det ar det. Om man ser du ur synpunkten om vad som ar bast for Putin och hans kompisar.

    Sett ur synpunkten for vad som ar bast for det ryska folket, ar uppforandet givetvis fullstandigt ologiskt.

    ”Inringandet” av Ryssland av allt mer demokratiska stater ar bra for det Ryska folket, eftersom det ar daligt for Ryska diktatorer.

  13. ”Sverige är väl ändå fritt och demokratiskt (nåja), men vi är inte med i nato!?! Du blandar ihop begreppen. ”

    Jorgen havdade aldrig att alla demokratiska lander ar med i Nato.

    ”En USA ledd försvarsallians, som skapades under kalla kriget MOT dåvarande sovjetunionen, vid rysslands gräns, är självklart något som Ryssarna borde oroa sig för. Att inte göra det vore synnerligen naivt.”

    Varfor det? Du verkar tro att Nato avser att invadera Ryssland. Du verkar likstalla en forsvarsallians mellan lander som mestadels ar demokratiska och en aggresiv diktatur. Hur kommer det sig att du likstaller dessa totalt vasenskilda saker?

    ”Jag tror knappast att George Bush skulle ha suttit med armarna i kors.”

    USA har ”suttit med armarna i kors” i liknande situationer massa ganger. Det finns flera tillfallen dar amerikaner har dodats, jag kan inte komma pa en enda gang USA har regaerat med att invadera landet.

  14. Nu har Regebro entrat scenen. Nu blir det bataljer.

    ”Det ar det. Om man ser du ur synpunkten om vad som ar bast for Putin och hans kompisar.

    Sett ur synpunkten for vad som ar bast for det ryska folket, ar uppforandet givetvis fullstandigt ologiskt.”

    Det var ungefär det jag menade. I militär synvinkel.

    ”Jorgen havdade aldrig att alla demokratiska lander ar med i Nato.”

    Han påstod att om Ryssland var demokratiskt och det fanns ett behov för nato så skulle Ryssland vara med. Uppenbarligen är det ett kriterium för att vara fri och demokratisk.

    ”Varfor det? Du verkar tro att Nato avser att invadera Ryssland. Du verkar likstalla en forsvarsallians mellan lander som mestadels ar demokratiska och en aggresiv diktatur. Hur kommer det sig att du likstaller dessa totalt vasenskilda saker?”

    Så vitt jag vet så har jag inte påstått att nato avser att invadera Ryssland. Och jag har ingenting emot att länder i östeuropa blir demokratiska. Men Ryssland, som diktatur, borde oroa sig för denna utveckling.

    ”USA har “suttit med armarna i kors” i liknande situationer massa ganger. Det finns flera tillfallen dar amerikaner har dodats, jag kan inte komma pa en enda gang USA har regaerat med att invadera landet.”

    Jag kanske borde ha lagt till att det skulle gagna deras utrikespolitik och medföra till ökat inflytande över mellanöstern. Där har mycket klenare casus bellin rättfärdigat invasioner.

  15. ”Han påstod att om Ryssland var demokratiskt och det fanns ett behov för nato så skulle Ryssland vara med. Uppenbarligen är det ett kriterium för att vara fri och demokratisk.”

    Nej, det slutsatsen kan du inte dra.

    ”Så vitt jag vet så har jag inte påstått att nato avser att invadera Ryssland. ”

    Du pastar ju att Nato ar ett hot mot ryssarna, sa indirekt har du det. Jag tror problemet har ar att du sager ”Ryssarna” nar du menar Putin. 🙂

    ”Där har mycket klenare casus bellin rättfärdigat invasioner.”

    Jasadu.

  16. ”Nej, det slutsatsen kan du inte dra.”

    Jaha. Det gick inte 🙁

    ”Du pastar ju att Nato ar ett hot mot ryssarna, sa indirekt har du det. Jag tror problemet har ar att du sager “Ryssarna” nar du menar Putin.”

    Med tanke på den politik som Ryssland för så är det ganska dumt att påstå att nato inte äventyrar den, men jag tror inte att de kommer att invadera Ryssland än på ett tag. Och jag säger ”ryssarna” när jag menar den ryska makteliten. De är väl också ryssar, och de är de som har makten. Det vill säga så länge ryssarna inte gör revolution igen och sliter den ur förtryckarnas hand.

    ”Jasadu.”

    Japp. Precis… Var det allt O.o?

  17. ”Jaha. Det gick inte”

    Inte om man skall ta hänsyn till logikens regler iaf. Men du är såklart fullt fri att vara ologisk om du vill. 🙂

    ”Med tanke på den politik som Ryssland för så är det ganska dumt att påstå att nato inte äventyrar den,”

    Nu sa du inte det, du sa ”ryssarna” vilket för mig implicerar ryska folket. Och Nato är inte ett hot mot det ryska folket. Det är ett hot mot den politik som rysslands ledning för, men eftersom den politiken är diktatorisk så är det BRA att NATO hotar den politiken. På dig lät det som om det var dåligt.

  18. ”Inte om man skall ta hänsyn till logikens regler iaf. Men du är såklart fullt fri att vara ologisk om du vill.”

    Jag känner mig böjd att undra om du inte skulle kunna utveckla det där en smula. Men okej.

    ”Nu sa du inte det, du sa “ryssarna” vilket för mig implicerar ryska folket. Och Nato är inte ett hot mot det ryska folket. Det är ett hot mot den politik som rysslands ledning för, men eftersom den politiken är diktatorisk så är det BRA att NATO hotar den politiken. På dig lät det som om det var dåligt.”

    Tja, för mig implicerar det rysslands ledning, och det var så jag menade. Du missuppfattade. Sedan så ogillar jag att nato växer, då jag inte anser att de har rent mjöl i påsen. Jag tror för övrigt att vi är överens om att nato kan äventyra den politik som Ryssland för.

  19. Ja. Men eftersom den politiken är diktatorisk och allmänt dålig, så tycker jag det är en bra sak. Du låter fortfarande som du tycker det är en dålig sak.

  20. Du vägrar att uttala dig klart och tydligt i saken, vilket bara kan tolkas som att du stöder Rysslands totalitära politik, men inser att du inte kan säga det rakt ut utan att avslöja dig själv som antidemokrat. Så därför avslöjar jag härmed dig som antidemokrat, så slipper du gömma dig.

  21. Skön kommentar Lennart!
    Realpolitik handlar ofta om att välja det minst dåliga alternativet, och här är Reid ute och cyklar i både djupt och grumligt vatten.

    En misstro mot USA och Nato innebär inte att man ska ta parti för halvtotalitära stater – för då har man ju valt det sämsta alternativet, istället för det näst sämsta…

  22. Rutger,
    I Ryssland blockeras oppositionen från media, och Putins ungdomförbund (kallad putinjugend) håller gatorna fria från oppositionella politiker. Demokratin i Ryssland är lika med noll. Är det där din uppfattning går isär?

    Dessutom finns en osund sammanblandning av näringsliv och politik, korruption, hotfull attityd mot grannländer, motstånd mot homosexuella, judar och andra minoriteter. Journalister hotas, i praktiken är media censurerat, internet avlyssnat, de mänskliga rättigheterna respekteras inte etc etc etc.

    USA med alla sina fel och brister är nog bättre än Ryssland. Du har valt fel häst, Reid.

  23. Nej, jag menar det jag säger. Till skillnad från dig, som bara implicerar det du menar hela tiden. Som det här till exempel:

    ”Våra åsikter om demokrati går helt klart isär.”

    Eftersom jag tycker att demokrati är bra, så innebär detta att du tycker det är dåligt. Men istället för att säga det rakt ut, så implicerar du det bara. Jag tycker det är ett lustigt sätt att debattera på. Kan du förklara varför du gör det? Jag gissar att det är för att du inte vågar stå för dina åsikter, men jag är inte helt säker.

    Hur som helst, att du stödjer en diktaturs olagliga invasion av ett grannland är ännu ett bevis för att du är antidemokrat. Så nu kan du nog sluta låtsas, och börja tala klarspråk istället. Debatten blir liksom mer meningsfull då. Fast det kanske du inte vill?

  24. Först svarar jag på Lennart:

    Jag anser också att demokrati är bra, och att den bör utökas till att gälla ekonomin. Vid ekonomin så stannar dagens folkstyre tvärt, och det är någonting man bör ändra på. Om du anser att demokrati är bra, så är det en punkt vi är överens på. Att du sedan automatiskt kallar mig antidemokrat för att jag stöder ett totalitärt lands agerande, är där vi går isär.

    ”Hur som helst, att du stödjer en diktaturs olagliga invasion av ett grannland är ännu ett bevis för att du är antidemokrat.”

    Invasionen är rättfärdig, då dess syfte är att skydda två separatist republiker från att annekteras. Sedan så är det klart att Ryssland har egna motiv, men uppenbart är att Georgien har provocerat fram denna aktion.

  25. ”I Ryssland blockeras oppositionen från media, och Putins ungdomförbund (kallad putinjugend) håller gatorna fria från oppositionella politiker. Demokratin i Ryssland är lika med noll. Är det där din uppfattning går isär?”

    En oroande utveckling. Det är inte där min uppfattning går isär.

    ”Dessutom finns en osund sammanblandning av näringsliv och politik, korruption, hotfull attityd mot grannländer, motstånd mot homosexuella, judar och andra minoriteter. Journalister hotas, i praktiken är media censurerat, internet avlyssnat, de mänskliga rättigheterna respekteras inte etc etc etc.”

    Illa, illa, illa. Tolerans är kärnan i ett rättvist samhälle.

    ”USA med alla sina fel och brister är nog bättre än Ryssland.”

    I USA finns två partier representerade i kongressen, och de har genom historien fört ungefär samma politik. Bättre än Ryssland, men inget riktigt föredöme.

  26. Reid,
    ”Bättre än Ryssland, men inget riktigt föredöme”.

    Ja, just det. Dessutom utövas stor makt regionalt i USA, genom val av guvenörer och andra folkrepresentanter. Om jag inte missminner mig så utnämnde Putin dessa poster själv i Ryssland. Vi kan hitta många fel i USA, särskilt under Bush-eran, men skillnaden gentemot Ryssland är ganska stor. USA är helt enkelt ett mycket mer demokratiskt land.